Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 3.

Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 3.

Kenneth Peacock made his first trip to Newfoundland in 1951. In total from the period of 1951 to 1960, he made six trips to the island during the summer months to travel and collect his recordings. In these trips, Peacock collected music exclusively in the outports of Newfoundland. These were the rural, more isolated communities, which were sustained primarily on the fishing industry. Like Barbeau, Peacock believed that authentically traditional music could only be found in the most rural areas; growing urban centres such as St. John’s had been influenced too much by modernity, especially communication technologies and thus modern culture itself.

Continue reading “Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 3.”

Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 2

Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 2

To understand the contributions made by Kenneth Peacock, we have to first appreciate the institutional context in which he did so much of his work. His fieldwork in Newfoundland would not have been possible were it not for the earlier interests and initiatives of Marius Barbeau. When he met Peacock, Barbeau was the head of the Folklore and Anthropology Department at the National Museum of Canada. Barbeau formally retired from the Museum in 1949, before Peacock began his fieldwork, however Barbeau continued his work and relationship with both Peacock and the Museum throughout his official retirement until his death in 1969 (1).

Continue reading “Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 2”

Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 1.

Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 1.

Almost a year ago to the day, I completed my Master of Arts Degree in Public History. As part of this degree, I wrote a Major Research Essay, and now that I’ve had enough distance from it to look back on my research without cringing *too* much, I think it only makes sense to start rewriting it for this space. I am a public historian after all!

Continue reading “Research Ramblings: Kenneth Peacock and the Newfoundland Folk Music Revival, Part 1.”